All Posts By

Chyla Anderson

The Honeymoon is Over…

By | Be Clear, Be Honest, Be Reasonable, Invoke Passion

If you are a regular reader of the Telltale Ten, then you probably caught Jacqueline’s New Year’s Eve post about how she doesn’t believe in New Year’s Resolutions. While I agree with her (and I’m not just saying that because she’s the boss) that traditional New Year’s Resolutions turn people into short-term fanatics before they inevitably give up, I don’t think they’re entirely useless. In fact, sometimes people actually succeed at what they set out to do. Now that we’re approaching the end of February, we are in prime-time resolution abandonment season. Leftover Valentine’s Day candy… St. Patrick’s Day booze—It’s all calling our names.  But maybe it’s not the resolution that leads us to failure, maybe it’s our perspective.

The (New Year’s Resolution) Honeymoon is Over

Every love story starts the same way… two people fall madly in love— they date, they get married, they go on a honeymoon— and then life gets real. We often treat our New Year’s Resolutions the same way. We adopt a new habit or quit an old one, thinking that it will “complete” us. We stop smoking, we drink more water, we go on a diet… And we start the year off with a brand new attitude, in love with the idea of our new and “better” selves.

I kept my resolution simple this year: drink a gallon of water a day. At least it sounded simple. I was out by the second week of January. I quickly realized that frequent water drinking = frequent trips to the bathroom, and my schedule just couldn’t support it. And you know why? Because I was approaching my resolution as a habit rather than a lifestyle change. A habit implies a lack of control, but a lifestyle is something we’re committed to living out every single day because it’s a part of us. We don’t quit after one moment of weakness. So what happens now that my New Year’s Resolution “honeymoon” is over? Rather than kissing my commitment goodbye, I’ve decided to kiss-and-make-up with them. I’ve decided to start thinking of my resolution as a part of my lifestyle instead of a temporary habit.

My expectations may have been too high at first… A gallon of water every day is a lot. But I can confidently say that I’m drinking way more water than I did last year. And that lesson transcends just a little New Year’s Resolution. While the “honeymoon phase” feels nice for a little while, a meaningful relationship is always better. And while we’ll never be perfect, we can always be better.

Treadmills, and Yoga and Slides…Oh My!

By | Be Honest, Have Fun, Invoke Passion, Motivate Others

Chyla is our new Social Media Marketing Intern. While I’m out here at SampleCon debating the future of sample, someone decided it would be a good idea to leave her in charge of the blog. The experiment paid off, and Chyla came up with a timely and insightful blog post about what millennials really want in the workplace. (Hint: it’s not just STUFF.)

Millennials & Workplace Culture

Everyone seems to be obsessed with creating a standout company culture these days. From treadmill desks, to unlimited vacation days, to gourmet cafes, there are lists and tips all over the internet trying to teach companies how to be more like the Googles and Zappos-es of the world by incorporating this stuff into their organizations. There’s also a multitude of articles about Millennials and what we really want. According to these articles, I want a lot of stuff.

The truth is, most of us just want an opportunity to carve out our own paths. Not that long ago, another SoapBoxSample Millennial, Sullivan, wrote a guest blog about his transition out of college and into the workforce. Like him, I’ve been learning a lot. We have been labeled as the generation of “entitlement”, but I (and most of the other Millennials I know) just want to work hard and grow like my parents did. So what does that mean for workplace culture?

1. We don’t need a yoga room… We need to not be overworked. I would rather get my work done and leave the office than spend part of my workday doing downward dog.


2. We don’t need a slide… We need to enjoy the work we’re doing. Sure, even adults like to have fun—so why shouldn’t the actual job be enjoyable?


3. We don’t need a game room… See number 2.


4. We don’t necessarily need treadmill desks, but it would be nice to not be glued to a regular desk all day. Here at SBS we even have a plank challenge throughout the day to get the blood flowing. It’s that simple.


5. We don’t need themed or quirky collaborative spaces, we need functional collaborative spaces. Don’t get me wrong, teams are awesome! But wouldn’t it be weird working on the set of “Up” after a while?

It’s not so much about the stuff. We don’t need it. I honestly don’t care if my job prepares gourmet food for me or supports my fitness goals. I can go to Chipotle or join a gym for that. What I care about is the opportunity for growth and the emotional intelligence of my leaders. I care about doing work that matters. SoapBoxSample doesn’t have a giant slide in the office or yoga breaks in the middle of the day. What it does have is an awesome group of people who are kind, open, and passionate about the work they’re doing. The opportunity to learn and grow from a company like that is way better than any treadmill desk could possibly be. Sure, the stuff is nice, but it’s the intangibles that really matter.