Monthly Archives

April 2017

Not All People Suck

By | Be Genuine, Create Value, Invoke Passion

MySoapBox Members Have Heart

In my first few weeks at ISA (before SoapBoxSample had even launched), I spent a lot of time in this small, somewhat dark office by myself trying to figure out what the heck I had gotten myself into. Launching an Online Research company from the ground up was complex.

The first week or so, I was in a panic. I wasn’t sure where to start or what to do first. There were a million things I needed to do, and had figured one of those out (after figuring out where to park my car and go to the restroom of course). I knew I wanted to create a company that fostered relationships.  One with a great culture that extended out to our clients AND our respondents.

The Telltale Ten and The Five Respondent Promises were pretty much the first thing that was” decided” on. The MySoapBox respondent promises are:

  • Your Choice
  • Your Rewards
  • Your Decisions
  • Your Impact
  • Your SoapBox

We are SUPER serious about fulfilling these promises to our members. We decided it would be super cool to have the MySoapBox panel members, submit the charity of their choice they would like us to donate to. We publish the names of three charities each month to the members, then throughout the month every single member can vote for the charity they want to receive the donation. The charity with the most votes, gets the check.

I love the members’ stories about why they are passionate around their chosen cause when submitting for consideration. I love the excitement when their charity gets picked. I love the letters the charities send us when they receive the donation. I love that people want to give back and this is a way for us to help them do so. I also love that this one small act, actually fulfills all five of our respondent promises.

There is a side benefit too. We find out what our panelists’ interests are and learn about causes we might not otherwise have known about. It helps us build a personal connection with our members. It helps build mutual trust and respect. I love that stuff.

Curious the types of charities our members have voted on? Well here is the list of all the winning charities since the launch of the MySoapBoxPanel. (Click the links to learn more.)

2017

The Humane Farming Association

Avery’s Angels Gastroschisis Foundation

American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

2016

Children’s Swedish Hospital

Child-Soldiers.org

CARE

Arizona Basset Hound Rescue

DFW Pug Rescue Club

Heading Home

Shaam Relief Foundation

Center for Biological Diversity

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Epilespsy Foundation

Honor Flight Network

Mitzvah Circle Foundation

2015

Disabled American Veterans

First Book

Jake Koenigsdorf Foundation

Smile Train

Feed the Children

Covenant House

Autism Speaks

Islamic Relief Canada

Adopt Together

Operation Family Fund

United Methodist Committee on Relief

National Fibromyalgia Foundation

2014

Humane Farming Association

Ever After Mustang Rescue

Kidd’s Kidds

Children’s Hope Chest

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

Doctors Without Borders

Growl Animal Rescue

Samaritan’s Purse

Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America

United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

National Down Syndrome Society

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

2013

Compassion International

The Humane Society

Free the Slaves

Samaritan’s Purse

World Food Program

Global Rescue for One

Keeper of the Wild

Community Tampa Bay

Women Speak for Themselves

Best Friends Animal Society

American Diabetes Association

The Smile Train

2012

Care to Learn

Wounded Warrior Project

Bags4Kids

 

 

 

Top Ten Most Absurd Respondent Requests

By | Be Honest, Be Reasonable, Have Fun

If you’ve ever worked in Market Research, you’ll understand. If you’ve ever worked in any industry where you have to make people happy, you’ll understand. This is my Top Ten, all-time favorite, most absurd respondent requests.

10. You should do a survey about my cats.

We’re working on something even better. A survey for cats. We have to train them how to read first.

9. Please delete my address and my name and all the information you turned over to the NSA.

Just for the record, we don’t share our respondent’s information with anyone. Even if they ask us really nicely.

8. Can you make your online surveys compatible with Windows 95?

This request was from 2016.

7. I cannot remember my username, password, why I contacted you, or who you are. Why aren’t you helping me?

I’m guilty of losing/forgetting my account passwords all.the.time. But usually I can remember why I got the account in the first place.

6. What about something for the [random bigotry] member? Thanks Obama.

Obama told me to tell you,  “You’re Welcome.”

5. Where’s the $100 dollars I was promised for the a five-minute survey about my Rock, Paper, Scissors strategy?

Let’s settle this like adults. I’ll Rock, Paper, Scissors you for it.

4. Instead of a Walmart gift card sent to my registered email address, can you please submit a Western Union payment to this totally legit IP-masked Russian website?

Not sketchy at all.

3. I don’t have to tell you my age, location, or gender, and I ignore your emails. Why wont you send me surveys I can get paid for?

Usually our clients want to know who’s opinion they’re paying for.

2. You’re just a robot anyway so why should I believe you?

In my experience robots are very trustworthy. They haven’t been programmed to lie. Yet.

1. How am I supposed to complete your surveys if I don’t lie?

So you won’t stop lying until we stop asking questions? Noted.

In the mood for more ridiculous Top Ten Lists? Check out Top Ten Bizarre Client Requests and Top Ten Most Ridiculous Respondent Email Addresses.

Lessons From a Ten Year Old

By | Inspire Ideas, Invoke Passion, Motivate Others

Don’t Raise Your Kid to Be an A$$

About two months ago my ten-year-old daughter was waiting on pins and needles to find out if she made pre-team at gymnastics. She wanted it so badly and was totally obsessed. We had no clue how she would fit it in with her other activities, but she was certain this was THE most important thing…like ever.

Finally, the news came. It turned out to be the best news ever. Well, from my perspective, not hers. She didn’t make the team. She was going to miss practice the day the coach was giving out the news and had to ask in advance. She wanted us to ask for her. There was no way we were going to do that. She timidly approached her coach (who is a total hard ass) and squeaked out, “Did I make it?” Her coach said no, and then proceeded to tell her what she needed to work on.

When she got home that night, she disappeared upstairs. My husband and I decided to go up and talk to her. We started to feel badly we made her go to the coach on her own, and started to second guess whether we were too strict with her. We walked up the stairs expecting to find her crying or otherwise sadly engrossed in some YouTube video. When we got up the stairs, we found her in the gym – practicing her strength and the skills her coach told her she needed to work on.

It was at that moment, I knew that her failure was absolutely the best thing that could have happened.

She then asked us to start taking her to more classes. She started taking two tumbling classes a week, an intermediate girls class and going to open gym for two hours on the weekends. She was incessantly handstanding all over the place. She did all the strength and core work at home. She would leave for school at 8 am and some days not get home until 8:30 pm. At that moment of failure she had a choice; quit, settle to just take classes, or work her a** off at something she was not naturally good at.

The week after she didn’t make team, I was at a business dinner and shared how happy I was she didn’t make the team. Another mother at the table looked at me like I was the worst mother ever – I didn’t care. She was seemingly appalled by my celebratory reaction to Antonella’s failure. Kids need to learn that they don’t get everything they want. Life is full of disappointments. You have to work (hard) for things you want and even when you do, you may not get them. They also need to learn that without failure, you don’t succeed.

Fast forward to last Monday night. Ella was working late after tumbling class on her back handspring and some other skills. We were the last to leave the gym around 8:45 pm. Late night for a 5th grader. She got home from gymnastics the next day and I happened to meet her in the garage as she got home – ready with my usual mom prodding about school, her friends, practice etc. She smiled coyly and looked down at the ground. She then told me Coach Brooke asked her to stay after. That’s when the coach told her she made pre-team. She had no idea. I had no idea. Her hard work had paid off. Her coach took notice. Antonella had EARNED her spot. It wasn’t given to her. Her coach followed up the good news with, “I only want kids who work hard. If you stop working hard, you will be removed from pre- team. If you keep working hard, you may actually make it from pre-team to team. Your work is just starting.”

In life we fail, in order to succeed, to keep working harder. Many adults haven’t figured this out yet. I am so inspired by Antonella. She makes me proud. I may also succeed at one of my life goals which is to not raise an a$$hole.

Why I Love Infographics

By | Be Genuine, Create Value, Inspire Ideas, Invoke Passion

In the early days of SoapBox, like a lot of startups, we had a tiny marketing budget. By being selective with our dollars and as persistent as cockroaches, (yes, someone called me a cockroach – although not the worst thing I have been called), we managed to carve out a name for ourselves. You can read more about our early marketing efforts here.

Although we’ve grown as a company, I still love behaving like a scrappy, nimble startup (plus, we still don’t have much budget). That’s one of the reasons why I love using infographics as a marketing tool. Yes, and…infographics are:

Identifiable: Infographics help to convey your brand personality— using colors, images, and a quirky design. Visual storytelling leaves a lasting impression on your clients.

Digestable: They provide a large amount of information in easy to consume, bite-sized pieces. Not everyone has time to sit down and read a 10 page white paper? I always mean to, but it often gets pushed aside.

Shareable: They are spreadable – maybe they even go viral. People are always looking for something to spice up their social media pages.

Valuable: The infographic I’m sharing today helps marketers understand how people search for the things they want to buy. And it gives clients an insight into how SoapBox uses data to reveal these insights.

And they just make me happy.

You can download your own copy of the Digital Path to Purchase here.